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African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husband

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Caashaqa
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African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husband

Postby Caashaqa » Wed Feb 19, 2014 6:27 pm



Meet Pamela Mohamed in Kenya! Pamela moved from the U.S. to bustling Nairobi, Kenya with her husband and children to escape a hectic American lifestyle. That was almost five years ago and she hasn’t looked back since! Pamela shared wonderfully open insight on adjusting and settling into her life in east Africa!

How long have you been living in Kenya and how long do you plan to stay there?
I’ve been here for almost five years. I’m not sure how long we will stay, but you never know where we will go next!

Is this the first country that you’ve been to in Africa?
This is my first time living in Africa, however I’ve been fortunate enough to have visited Senegal, Somalia and Uganda for business/work and Zanzibar for pleasure. My must-see places to visit, InshaAllah (God willing) are South Africa, Morocco and Ghana.

What brought you to Kenya?
I literally moved here for a change in life and opportunity and for our three children to experience a world outside of the States. My husband and I visited my brother-in-law who had moved here for a job in 2005. Fast forward, I came home from work one day very stressed out and told my hubby, “baby, let’s move to Kenya”. Two months later to the date we did just that. My Somalian born hubby was all for it.

Can you talk about what you do professionally?
I’ve been a registered nurse for over 20 years in the States and I made sure I immediately got my license here since I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do professionally. I completed the required training, and as of September 2013 I am a Registered Midwife. In addition, I graduated with a Masters of Public Health in December of 2013. My dream is to open a health center and provide excellent maternity and child care, InshaAllah.


I also co-own a restaurant and bakery with my brother-in-law called The Mug, in town. Alhamdulillah (Thank God) the restaurant is doing well. I feel there are more business opportunities here versus in the States.

What advice can you give for African Americans who want to be involved in starting a business in Kenya or in Africa?

Find something you are passionate in, have patience and do not to be naïve or quick to trust people.

What’s life like in Kenya for you?
Our life here is good, Alhamdulillah. As long as I have my hubby and kids here I am happy and can live anywhere. I transitioned well but admit I stressed my poor husband out because when we first moved here I wasn’t busy and didn’t know a lot of people. My husband encouraged me to go back to school for my masters which took that boredom right out the door. Now I’m comfortable living here, have my own routine, meet great people and appreciating this experience of living abroad.


What do you love the most about living here?

The quality of life is better here, especially for a family, and I’m able to spend more time with the kids.
Having an extra pair of hands (nanny/cook) to assist with cleaning, cooking, and transporting helps tremendously.
I love the weather. 99% of the time it’s perfect - not too hot and not too cold.
I love that my family is eating organic fresh foods and as well as healthier less processed food.
Importantly, I feel more comfortable being a practicing Muslim. Our children are able to learn even more about our religion. I enjoy spending the Ramadan month of fasting even more than just the date because there’s much more of a community here, even among the non-Muslims. I was surprised how many Eid greetings I would receive from friends who are not Muslims.
Our children attend a British curriculum private school where they are taught multiple languages: French, Kiswahili and Arabic, which I think is wonderful.
Everything is here! You can find any kind of restaurant, nice movie theatres, home massage treatments etc. And I have a young lady come to my house to do my daughter Naima’s and I’s hair.

What were the most difficult things to adjust to?

People’s concept of time is terrible. The term ‘African time’ is true. It’s difficult for me because I’m very punctual.
Traffic is terrible and there are aggressive drivers, especially the public transportation drivers, however infrastructure in this sector is improving.
People assume that since I’m from America I have Donald Trump money. I quickly school them on that.
It’s frustrating how much of everything is a long tedious process. Something that could be handled fast and easy isn’t always done that way. And to make matters worse, people assume you know the process.
I had to learn how to deal with many Kenyans style of communication as they do not like confrontations. They can’t say “no”. Most times they can’t come out and say what they really mean. I have no tolerance for it. However, overall they are friendly people.
Not having a Target or Wal-Mart here is frustrating. That should be number one on the list of most difficult things to adjust to. A store that sells EVERYTHING is nada here. One day I was driving around looking for buttons for my daughter’s uniform. Going to town was not an option. Of course I go to the one store that does supply the buttons, and it had closed at 6pm. I arrived 6:02pm.

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Re: African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husb

Postby FarhanYare » Wed Feb 19, 2014 6:40 pm

Mashallah :up:

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Re: African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husb

Postby Meyle » Wed Feb 19, 2014 6:41 pm

:up: :up:

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Re: African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husb

Postby FarhanYare » Wed Feb 19, 2014 6:50 pm



Meet Pamela Mohamed in Kenya! Pamela moved from the U.S. to bustling Nairobi, Kenya with her husband and children to escape a hectic American lifestyle. That was almost five years ago and she hasn’t looked back since! Pamela shared wonderfully open insight on adjusting and settling into her life in east Africa!

How long have you been living in Kenya and how long do you plan to stay there?
I’ve been here for almost five years. I’m not sure how long we will stay, but you never know where we will go next!

Is this the first country that you’ve been to in Africa?
This is my first time living in Africa, however I’ve been fortunate enough to have visited Senegal, Somalia and Uganda for business/work and Zanzibar for pleasure. My must-see places to visit, InshaAllah (God willing) are South Africa, Morocco and Ghana.

What brought you to Kenya?
I literally moved here for a change in life and opportunity and for our three children to experience a world outside of the States. My husband and I visited my brother-in-law who had moved here for a job in 2005. Fast forward, I came home from work one day very stressed out and told my hubby, “baby, let’s move to Kenya”. Two months later to the date we did just that. My Somalian born hubby was all for it.

Can you talk about what you do professionally?
I’ve been a registered nurse for over 20 years in the States and I made sure I immediately got my license here since I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do professionally. I completed the required training, and as of September 2013 I am a Registered Midwife. In addition, I graduated with a Masters of Public Health in December of 2013. My dream is to open a health center and provide excellent maternity and child care, InshaAllah.


I also co-own a restaurant and bakery with my brother-in-law called The Mug, in town. Alhamdulillah (Thank God) the restaurant is doing well. I feel there are more business opportunities here versus in the States.

What advice can you give for African Americans who want to be involved in starting a business in Kenya or in Africa?

Find something you are passionate in, have patience and do not to be naïve or quick to trust people.

What’s life like in Kenya for you?
Our life here is good, Alhamdulillah. As long as I have my hubby and kids here I am happy and can live anywhere. I transitioned well but admit I stressed my poor husband out because when we first moved here I wasn’t busy and didn’t know a lot of people. My husband encouraged me to go back to school for my masters which took that boredom right out the door. Now I’m comfortable living here, have my own routine, meet great people and appreciating this experience of living abroad.


What do you love the most about living here?

The quality of life is better here, especially for a family, and I’m able to spend more time with the kids.
Having an extra pair of hands (nanny/cook) to assist with cleaning, cooking, and transporting helps tremendously.
I love the weather. 99% of the time it’s perfect - not too hot and not too cold.
I love that my family is eating organic fresh foods and as well as healthier less processed food.
Importantly, I feel more comfortable being a practicing Muslim. Our children are able to learn even more about our religion. I enjoy spending the Ramadan month of fasting even more than just the date because there’s much more of a community here, even among the non-Muslims. I was surprised how many Eid greetings I would receive from friends who are not Muslims.
Our children attend a British curriculum private school where they are taught multiple languages: French, Kiswahili and Arabic, which I think is wonderful.
Everything is here! You can find any kind of restaurant, nice movie theatres, home massage treatments etc. And I have a young lady come to my house to do my daughter Naima’s and I’s hair.

What were the most difficult things to adjust to?

People’s concept of time is terrible. The term ‘African time’ is true. It’s difficult for me because I’m very punctual.
Traffic is terrible and there are aggressive drivers, especially the public transportation drivers, however infrastructure in this sector is improving.
People assume that since I’m from America I have Donald Trump money. I quickly school them on that.
It’s frustrating how much of everything is a long tedious process. Something that could be handled fast and easy isn’t always done that way. And to make matters worse, people assume you know the process.
I had to learn how to deal with many Kenyans style of communication as they do not like confrontations. They can’t say “no”. Most times they can’t come out and say what they really mean. I have no tolerance for it.
However, overall they are friendly people.
Not having a Target or Wal-Mart here is frustrating. That should be number one on the list of most difficult things to adjust to. A store that sells EVERYTHING is nada here. One day I was driving around looking for buttons for my daughter’s uniform. Going to town was not an option. Of course I go to the one store that does supply the buttons, and it had closed at 6pm. I arrived 6:02pm.
This is what nearly everyone who goes to Kenya says. :o

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Re: African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husb

Postby guhad122 » Wed Feb 19, 2014 7:16 pm

Actually by nature that is how most Africans are. We need to be upfront and learn how to say "NO". Have you ever had a call from family member from back home and they ask for something; 99% of us will say "waan kuusoo diri doonaa", which is basically our way of saying NO.

Kudos to this brother who married the sister and reconciled the family's tradition with that of the new family member.

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Re: African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husb

Postby Methylamine » Wed Feb 19, 2014 7:26 pm

Her husband looks really familiar...

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Re: African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husb

Postby Caashaqa » Wed Feb 19, 2014 7:36 pm

Her husband looks really familiar...
How familiar :lol:

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Re: African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husb

Postby Methylamine » Wed Feb 19, 2014 7:50 pm

Coulda sworn I've seen him somewhere

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Re: African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husb

Postby Vivacious » Thu Feb 20, 2014 3:08 am

^ He looks familiar to me too or may be he resembles a famous Somali politician or something :lol: I don't know :|

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Re: African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husb

Postby Tanker » Thu Feb 20, 2014 6:49 am

disgusting :down: :down: :down: :down:

of all the females in the world he married a bantu the race with the most ugly females now he is going to get children that looks like monkies and his wife is going to be an adoon among the somalis lower than midgaan :cry:

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Re: African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husb

Postby barbarossa » Thu Feb 20, 2014 7:02 am

disgusting :down: :down: :down: :down:

of all the females in the world he married a bantu the race with the most ugly females now he is going to get children that looks like monkies and his wife is going to be an adoon among the somalis lower than midgaan :cry:
Here comes another self-hating Skinny Negroid! Deal with your low inferiority complex by embracing your real ethnicity.

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Re: African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husb

Postby Hyperactive » Thu Feb 20, 2014 9:11 am

disgusting :down: :down: :down: :down:

of all the females in the world he married a bantu the race with the most ugly females now he is going to get children that looks like monkies and his wife is going to be an adoon among the somalis lower than midgaan :cry:
this is not true for somalis. somalis discriminate midgan, tumaal,our Bantu, each other's tribe but not ajnabi whatever their colour are.

Somali wey habaran yiheen, into da badan. maska7da bey ka habaran yiheen, educated or not.

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Re: African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husb

Postby Cherine » Thu Feb 20, 2014 10:49 am

disgusting :down: :down: :down: :down:

of all the females in the world he married a bantu the race with the most ugly females now he is going to get children that looks like monkies and his wife is going to be an adoon among the somalis lower than midgaan :cry:

Jealousy is a bitch as they say.

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Re: African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husb

Postby Tanker » Thu Feb 20, 2014 1:08 pm

lool jealous of a baboon :roll:

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Re: African American who moved to kenya with her Somali husb

Postby GalliumerianSlayer » Thu Feb 20, 2014 3:05 pm

Tanker go to Tel-Aviv, since you constantly mourn for them. Try to advocate your LGBT in the Middle-East if you can.


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