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Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

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Ben Dover
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Re: Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

Postby Ben Dover » Fri Dec 07, 2018 6:34 pm

OD, for once, stop being a pest and sit this one out.

Unless, of course, you want to contribute to this discussion in a meaningful way and discuss Somali Republic's appalling development metrics posted above, and offer why your paradise Somali Republic's GDP for instance was almost a third of Madagascar's. No emotions, just facts.

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Re: Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

Postby AwRastaale » Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:36 pm

You guys make no sense and all these essays are useless. So what if Madagascar had bigger per capita than Somali Republic? Every nation is different defined by a lot of factors including history, geolocations (conflict zone, peaceful region, economic zone, neighbors, etc).

Kuwait has bigger per capita than the United States. So what?

You guys just comparing irrelevant factors.

Let's compare Madagascar's literacy campaign to that one of the Somali Republic. That's more realistic--apples vs apples.
774 million people aged 15 and older are illiterate, an infographic (pdf) from Unesco details. 52 percent (pdf) live in south and west Asia and 22 percent in sub-Saharan Africa. The latter region is where most of the countries with the lowest literacy rates in the world are located, according to data from the C.I.A.:

1. Burkina Faso: 21.8 percent of the adults in this West African country are literate.

2. South Sudan: This country in east Africa, which became an independent state in 2011, has a literary rate of 27 percent.

3 Afghanistan: 28.1 percent of this country’s population are literate with a far higher percentage of men (43.1 percent) than women (12.6 percent) able to read.

4. Niger: The ratio of men to women in this landlocked western African country is also lopsided: the literacy rate is 42.9 percent for men, 15.1 percent for women and 28.7 percent overall.

5. Mali: Niger’s neighbor on the west, the literacy rate in Mali is 33.4 percent. 43.1 percent of the adult male population can read and 24.6 percent of the country’s women.

6. Chad: This west African country is Niger’s neighbor on its eastern border; 34.5 percent of its population is literate.

7. Somalia: Long beset by civil war and famine, 37.8 of Somalia’s population is literate. 49.7 percent of the adult male population is literate but only 25.8 percent of adult females.

8. Ethiopia: Somalia’s neighbor to the north, the literacy rate in Ethiopia is 39 percent.

9. Guinea: 41 percent of this west African country’s population is literate. More than half (52 percent) of adult males are literature and only 30 percent of women.

10. Benin: 42.4 percent of Benin in West Africa are literate.
Madagascar is now around the 64-68% average literacy rate. In that class it puts us to shame. No drama.

Somalia only began its literacy in 1974. For 28 years it remained dead and still to be close to Ethiopia, is miracle itself. What Siad Barre did is still the greatest literacy campaign Africa has ever known. And literacy was much higher than it is today. We definitely need to educate our women. That's where the major gap is.


Don't be self haters. I know you want the secessionist project but the world only knows one Somali race.

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Re: Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

Postby Voltage » Fri Dec 07, 2018 9:24 pm

Bendover, see Awrastaale's point. Like I said before, to you everything is about BARRE, BARRE, BARRE.

To you, the economic and developmental state of Somalis is entirely about Barre and not;

1. The people (nomadic herdsmen)
2. Culture (pastoralism)
3. Resources (almost zero except livestock)
Etc etc etc

Somalia's deficiencies compared to say Madagascar in GDP is not an indictment on Barre, perhaps it is resources with Madagascar having some of the world's largest rubber resources? What did the Arabs do to deserve their oil resources?

If you even had a basic understanding of economy, an appropriate comparison would be comparing Barre to the period in Somalia immediately before him. That way the "control" is the nation (including people, culture, resources, rtc) and what we would be analyzing is what did he contribute or take away from Somalia.

Essentially you cannot give one person a gallon of milk and another half a cup and then try to make a comparison about how many people they can feed. The practical comparison would be to give both the same glass of milk and see how many mouths they can feed.

For example, Somalia had a 10 year "democratic" government. Compare Barre's first 10 years to it or even the average of his reign to the 1960's to see his successes and failures with what he had.

Your argument about facts and figures are without context. They are literally in a vacuum. That you cannot understand that is a reflection of the limitations of your own deductive reasoning skills not understanding basic scientific methodology.

This is why we say Barre was the best thing to happen to Somali people in history and not Barre was the best thing to happen to the world.

It's called context.

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Re: Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

Postby AwRastaale » Fri Dec 07, 2018 9:55 pm

If Barre is solely responsible for Somalia's GDP rather than its history (both governance and human development), resources, its geolocation (highly contested region where superpower rivalry spilled over and the nation became a proxy war, lifestyle such as pastoralism), then we should also blame Hargeisa pretend administration for the droughts, all the bole halls, lack of roads, the nonexistent GDP, the lack of international recognition, the poor education system.

If Barre held them back, why didn't they speed ahead like Singapore? Surely 28 years is more than enough to create tangible results. Barre ruled 21 year and if his 21 years created all the nightmares and misfortunes that you count, then 28 years should have been more than enough to reserve the situation. Instead what we have seen is things deteriorate far worse.

What have you gotto show for?

The great drought campaign: He used 615 trucks, 24 transport planes, he built 16 emergency landing airstrips, food provided, clothing. It was swift and phenomenal.







11,000 people came together to fight sand dunes in the great land erosion, degradation campaign. I am yet to see Muse Bihi bring together 11 people for common goal.



As someone from the Ethiopian-occupied Hawd, this is the Somali Republic that appeals to me most because when I sit across the table with the Galla, Amhara, Gurage, Tigre-----and they ask me what have the Somalis achieved. That's what I use against them. That's the proud Somali race. It's not mere fadhi ku dirir for my reer against that reer or hurting my cousin's feelings------its the bigger things. It's what I'm proud of us a Somali.

Like I said the Gallas, Amhara, Gurage and Tigres have not had a leader like Barre. Meles and Isaias were students of Barre. Each tried to micmic in his own right the way of Barre.

Stop crying and appreciate the good and not just focus on his short comings. There are 10000000s of pages on that. At least don't spoil one topic.

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Re: Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

Postby Ben Dover » Sat Dec 08, 2018 6:42 am

Bendover, see Awrastaale's point. Like I said before, to you everything is about BARRE, BARRE, BARRE.

To you, the economic and developmental state of Somalis is entirely about Barre and not;

1. The people (nomadic herdsmen)
2. Culture (pastoralism)
3. Resources (almost zero except livestock)
Etc etc etc

Somalia's deficiencies compared to say Madagascar in GDP is not an indictment on Barre, perhaps it is resources with Madagascar having some of the world's largest rubber resources? What did the Arabs do to deserve their oil resources?

If you even had a basic understanding of economy, an appropriate comparison would be comparing Barre to the period in Somalia immediately before him. That way the "control" is the nation (including people, culture, resources, rtc) and what we would be analyzing is what did he contribute or take away from Somalia.

Essentially you cannot give one person a gallon of milk and another half a cup and then try to make a comparison about how many people they can feed. The practical comparison would be to give both the same glass of milk and see how many mouths they can feed.

For example, Somalia had a 10 year "democratic" government. Compare Barre's first 10 years to it or even the average of his reign to the 1960's to see his successes and failures with what he had.

Your argument about facts and figures are without context. They are literally in a vacuum. That you cannot understand that is a reflection of the limitations of your own deductive reasoning skills not understanding basic scientific methodology.

This is why we say Barre was the best thing to happen to Somali people in history and not Barre was the best thing to happen to the world.

It's called context.

Actually it is you kacaan apologists whose entire POV is framed by Barre, defending Barre, making preposterous claims as means of praising Barre, its pitiful. I am objectively looking at his performance compared other nations in the region i.e. peers. It is worthy of note that so far, not a single one of you Kacaanists was able to engage with the abysmal figures presented.

Your attempt to avoid direct comparison between the Somali Republic and its peers in subsaharan Africa only underscores your acknowledgments that the Somali Republic severely lagged behind equivalent peer economies of the time. This only speaks of the developmental and economical failures of Barre and destroys your rose-tinted fantasy that Somalis somehow 'had it good' during the kacaan.

My point was clear, your immediate family might have had it good in Mogadishu, but for the vast majority of Somalis living across the nation the story was one of hardship and poverty, a tyrannical rule that mismanaged and squandered away the good will of the international community and failed to capitalise on the unprecedented access to international aid it had. Barre was by all economical metrics a terrible leader, and the Somali Republic was by all economical metrics a terribly run state. The fact that you are attempting to argue otherwise in the face of overwhelming evidence only highlights your irrational devotion to this tyrant, which we know is only due to tribal loyalty.

And please, do not attempt to attribute Madagascar's almost 3X GDP in comparison to the Somali Republic to their "rubber resources", that is another stupid argument you are making. The Somali Republic was resource rich, maybe even more so than Madagascar, but a failure to capitalise on said resources is, again, attributable to Barre's mismanagement of the country. Besides, it was not only Madagascar's economy that leaped the Somali Republic's, this was the case with most economies of the region. If we look at GDPs of regional economies at the time we see:

Tanzania: $10.4 Billion
Ethiopia: $8.9 Billion
Kenya $8.5 Billion
Uganda: $7.4 Billion
Gabon: $3.7 Billion
Papua: New Guinea $3.9 Billion
Gabon: $3.7 Billion
Zambia: $3.7 Billion
Madagascar: $3.5 Billion
Senegal: $2.8 Billion
Malawi: $2.1 Billion
Somali Republic: 1.3 Billion

Tanzania's GDP was almost 10X that of the Somali Republic! Zambia was almost 3X! Absolutely abysmal figures after 14 years of kacaan rule.

The story is not different when we look at GDP per capita:

Gabon: $4619
Papua New Guinea: $1215
Uganda: $601
Zambia: $562
Tanzania: $513
Senegal: $449
Kenya: $484
Madagascar: $371
Malawi: $298
Somali Republic: $250

I can go on about other metrics as well...

All the available data paint a picture of the Somali Republic being a miserable state, run by an incompetent tyrannical junta, which lags behind even impoverished subsaharan African states on economic and developmental metrics. Beyond sheer indho-adayg and qabiil-fuelled empty rhetoric, there is no justifying these figures. The Kacaan apologists' propaganda of Barre being a capable leader or the Kacaan period being one of prosperity for Somalis, is just that, propaganda and another attempt at historical revisionism.

No amount of youtube clips of Chinese-built roads or Soviet-Union run hospitals in Mogadishu can challenge the basic presentation of historical economic indicators above. Your false memory of living large on embezzled money in Mogadishu was not a reality for the vast majority of people. You probably still feel the need to defend your hero but your arguments dont stand up to scrutiny, this is not a battle you can win.

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Re: Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

Postby Voltage » Sat Dec 08, 2018 4:26 pm

You're complete dense.

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Re: Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

Postby original dervish » Sat Dec 08, 2018 7:04 pm

Benny.......compare what the British left you after 100 years to what the MSB aun govt bequeathed you after 10 years. :)

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Re: Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

Postby Lancer » Sat Dec 08, 2018 8:45 pm

Image


God bless the Soviets.

Somethings never change. Somalia an

aid recipient since its inception.


https://www.nytimes.com/1975/07/12/arch ... .html?_r=0

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Re: Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

Postby AbkoowDhiblaawe » Sat Dec 08, 2018 9:41 pm

Sauron and bendover backing up what they’re saying by sources. While voltage is writing emotional essays.

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Re: Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

Postby Ben Dover » Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:30 am

Image


God bless the Soviets.

Somethings never change. Somalia an

aid recipient since its inception.


https://www.nytimes.com/1975/07/12/arch ... .html?_r=0

Yet you will see these shameless kacaan apologists attempting to claim that "aabo Siaad lifted these nomads" :lol:

Absolutely shameless.

Sauron and bendover backing up what they’re saying by sources. While voltage is writing emotional essays.
Thats all they have, emotional pleas and propaganda. Failing that they play the fake nationalism card.

They all disappeared as soon as figures and data of their beloved kacaan were brought up :).

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Re: Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

Postby X.Playa » Tue Dec 11, 2018 2:40 pm

If Barre is solely responsible for Somalia's GDP rather than its history (both governance and human development), resources, its geolocation (highly contested region where superpower rivalry spilled over and the nation became a proxy war, lifestyle such as pastoralism), then we should also blame Hargeisa pretend administration for the droughts, all the bole halls, lack of roads, the nonexistent GDP, the lack of international recognition, the poor education system.

If Barre held them back, why didn't they speed ahead like Singapore? Surely 28 years is more than enough to create tangible results. Barre ruled 21 year and if his 21 years created all the nightmares and misfortunes that you count, then 28 years should have been more than enough to reserve the situation. Instead what we have seen is things deteriorate far worse.

What have you gotto show for?

The great drought campaign: He used 615 trucks, 24 transport planes, he built 16 emergency landing airstrips, food provided, clothing. It was swift and phenomenal.







11,000 people came together to fight sand dunes in the great land erosion, degradation campaign. I am yet to see Muse Bihi bring together 11 people for common goal.



As someone from the Ethiopian-occupied Hawd, this is the Somali Republic that appeals to me most because when I sit across the table with the Galla, Amhara, Gurage, Tigre-----and they ask me what have the Somalis achieved. That's what I use against them. That's the proud Somali race. It's not mere fadhi ku dirir for my reer against that reer or hurting my cousin's feelings------its the bigger things. It's what I'm proud of us a Somali.

Like I said the Gallas, Amhara, Gurage and Tigres have not had a leader like Barre. Meles and Isaias were students of Barre. Each tried to micmic in his own right the way of Barre.

Stop crying and appreciate the good and not just focus on his short comings. There are 10000000s of pages on that. At least don't spoil one topic.
Bich sometimes the world doesn't revolve around your wide wet cunt. stop this constant nagging because you got slapped couple times and barred from the IPG. Even if you put on a g-string up your hairy ass and have Voltage pick you up for one night stand like Dafle use to pick up your uncle Warancade , it won't change the fact that Afweyne was one of the lowest African tin-pot dictator that left no country after his rule.

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Re: Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

Postby AwRastaale » Wed Dec 12, 2018 2:57 am

^^Sorry mate don't speak Burmese.

Let me know when Google translator adds to its list.

These issues are for Somalis (and that means Muslim).

It doesn't concern al murtad who will get stoned even if he came to Muse Abdalle country :mrgreen:

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Re: Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

Postby X.Playa » Wed Dec 12, 2018 1:13 pm

^^Sorry mate don't speak Burmese.

Let me know when Google translator adds to its list.

These issues are for Somalis (and that means Muslim).

It doesn't concern al murtad who will get stoned even if he came to Muse Abdalle country :mrgreen:
Bitch either refute what Ben presented or shut up at once , you shaking your booty on Voltage doesn't negate the facts the man presented. You are like an annoying mosquito buzzing in every shameful thread doing unsolicited niiko out of spite. You are an emotional whore , not take a break.

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Re: Archives: Somalia’s literacy campaign

Postby AwRastaale » Fri Dec 14, 2018 9:36 pm

Burmese foreigner,

Unlike you I have no issue with Ben Dover having an opinion and unlike you nasty al Murtad he expressed himself well. His argument is legit and he has every right to have it just like any of us including Voltage.

It's not a zero sum game kid and certainly doesn't concern al murtadeen.


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